Welcome to our BlogSpot and thank you for visiting. During emergency incidents you may NOT see updates on the center of the page. On the right side please view the twitter updates.

During large emergencies our Joint Information Center will be activated, citizens with questions or concerns may call 619-590-3160.

San Diego County residents interested in an educational presentation to your community group, please email Michael.Mohler@fire.ca.gov

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Sandbag Locations


CAL FIRE/San Diego County Fire Authority has sandbags available at fire stations across the county. It is important not to wait to the last minute to plan for any type of flooding. Please refer to the below site for sandbag locations.
http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/dpw/

Monday, December 20, 2010

CAL FIRE/San Diego County Fire Authority Urges Safety On The Winter Roads



With a major storm system upon California, the chilling months bring rain, ice and other hazardous weather conditions that are the main cause for the increase in traffic accidents. This winter season, CAL FIRE is advising all drivers to take extra precautions while behind the wheel. Last year alone, CAL FIRE responded to over 6,000 vehicle accidents in the months of November, December and January statewide.

To help steer clear of vehicle accidents this winter, CAL FIRE/San Diego County Fire Authority recommends the following:
  1. Use the weather conditions as a guide to slow down.
  2. Avoid sudden stops and quick direction changes, and be sure to leave additional distance between your vehicle and the one ahead.
  3. If visibility is limited, slow down and keep a constant watch for other vehicles.
  4. Be mindful of icy roads. Black ice can be nearly invisible and temperatures do not have to be below freezing for ice to form on road surfaces.
  5. If the vehicle begins to slide while driving on ice or snow, avoid using the break. Instead, slowly release the gas pedal and steer the vehicle in the right direction.

For updated road conditions visit CAL TRANS.

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Holiday Candle Safety




December is the peak time of year for home candle fires. In December 13% of home candle fires began with decorations compared to 4% the rest of the year. These fires caused an annual average of 166 civilian deaths, 1,289 civilian fire injuries, and 450 million in direct property damage over a 4 year study. CAL FIRE/San Diego County Fire Authority would like to remind everyone the importance of candle safety during the holidays, Below are some very valuable safety tips.


USE CANDLE HOLDERS THAT ARE STURDY, AND WON'T TIP OVER.

PUT CANDLE HOLDERS ON A UNCLUTTERED SURFACE

LIGHT CANDLES CAREFULLY, KEEP YOUR HAIR AND ANY LOOSE CLOTHING AWAY FROM THE FLAME

DON'T BURN THE CANDLE ALL THE WAY DOWN-PUT IT OUT BEFORE IT GETS TOO CLOSE TO THE HOLDER OR CONTAINER

NEVER USE A CANDLE IF OXYGEN IS USED IN THE HOME

HAVE FLASHLIGHTS AND BATTERY- POWERED LIGHTING IN CASE OF A POWER OUTAGE, NEVER USE CANDLES.

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Off Road Vehicle accident sends two to local hospital

On Tuesday December 14, 2010, just before 5:00 pm  1 CAL FIRE engine company, 2 rescues, 1 paramedic ambulance, 1 Sheriff helicopter, under the command of Battalion Chief John Francois responded to a head on off road vehicle accident on the Bear Valley Truck Trail approximately 5 miles south of Interstate 8 in the community of Pine Valley.

 


The accident resulted in the injury of two people,  one acute and one moderate status. The patients were transported to a local hospital by helicopter.

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Traffic Collision Injuries 6

On Sunday, December 5th 2010, just after 11:00 am, 4 engine companies, 3 advanced life support ambulances, 1 basic life support ambulance, 1 Mercy Air Helicopter, under the direction of Battalion Chief Dave Allen responded to a multi casualty traffic collision at the six mile marker of Otay Lakes Road.


The incident resulted in the injury of 6 patients; Mercy Air 6 transported one to Scripps Mercy Hospital, 2 were transported to Rady Children's Hospital, and three were transported to UCSD Medical Center. Otay Lakes was closed in both directions while firefighters treated the injured and the California Highway Patrol investigated the cause of the accident.

Seat belts save over 13,000 lives every year one of them could be yours…

The top 5 things you should know about buckling up.

1.  Buckling up is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a crash.
  • In 2008, seat belts saved more than 13,000 lives nationwide. From 2004 to 2008, seat belts saved over 75,000 lives — enough people to fill a large sports arena. During a crash, being buckled up helps keep you safe and secure inside your vehicle, whereas being completely thrown out of a vehicle is almost always deadly. Seat belts are the best defense against impaired, aggressive, and distracted drivers.
2.  Air bags are designed to work with seat belts, not replace them.
  • In fact, if you don’t wear your seat belt, you could be thrown into a rapidly opening frontal air bag; a movement of such force could injure or even kill you. See http://www.safercar.gov/ for more on air bag safety. 
3.  How to buckle up  safely:
  • Follow the guidelines shown in the photo to the right. As you can see, the lap belt and shoulder belt are secured across the pelvis and rib cage, which are more able to withstand crash forces than other parts of your body.
4.  Fit matters.
  • Before you buy a new car, check to see that its seat belts are a good fit for you.
  • Ask your dealer about seat belt adjusters, which can help you get the best fit.
  • If you need a roomier belt, contact your vehicle manufacturer to obtain seat belt extenders.
  • If you drive an older or classic car with lap belts only, check with your vehicle manufacturer about how to retrofit your car with today’s safer lap/shoulder belts.
5.  Occupant protection is for everyone.
  • Visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Web site at http://www.nhtsa.gov/ and click on 4 Steps for Kids to find out how to secure your littlest passengers.
  • If you’re expecting a little one, check out NHTSA’s “Should pregnant women wear seat belts?” brochure online to learn how important it is for you — and your unborn child — to buckle up the right way every trip, every time.

Thursday, December 2, 2010

CDFF Inspirational '10

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Christmas Light safety



Christmas lights are beautiful and much safer than candles, but all that electricity can cause problems if not used properly. Christmas lights can get hot enough to burn or ignite other decorations. The cords can fray, leading to a short. Decorating with lights often requires the use of a ladder, and improper use could lead to an injury. Practice ladder safety when you are putting up Christmas lights.
When you put up Christmas lights this season - or holiday lights during any season - be sure to follow these Christmas light safety tips.

Choose Christmas lights that have been tested and deemed safe by a reputable testing laboratory, the best are UL or ETL. Christmas lights listed as safe by these laboratories will note that on the packaging.

Try to use the cooler-burning "mini" Christmas lights as opposed to the traditional larger bulbs. The older style burns much hotter.

Only use Christmas lights that have fuses in the plugs.

Inspect each set of Christmas lights - old or new - for damage. Return or throw out any set with cracked or broken sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections.

Replace burned out bulbs promptly with bulbs of the same wattage.

Never hang Christmas lights on a metal tree. The tree can become charged with electricity and shock someone. The tree can also short out the Christmas lights and cause a fire.

Want Christmas lights outdoors? Use outdoor Christmas lights. The packaging will note whether the lights can be used indoors, outdoors, or both.

All outdoor electrical decorations should be plugged into a ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI). You can buy portable units for outdoor use, or you can have them permanently installed by an electrician.

Use extension cords properly. Outdoor cords can be used inside or outside. Do not overload extension cords - they can get hot enough to burn.

Stay away from powerlines or feeder lines (these go from the pole to the house).

Secure outside Christmas lights with insulated holders (never use tacks or nails) or run strings of lights through hooks.

When you leave or go to bed at night, turn off your Christmas lights.

Never pull on a string of Christmas lights, it stresses the cords and can lead to fraying. Store Christmas lights loosely wrapped for the same reason.